Africa Cube

2017 FTTH Africa Council Conference Review

This year’s 2017 FTTH Africa Council Conference highlighted some interesting developments that were presented and discussed among the delegates. These are our key take-outs from the conference:

Besides looking at the fibre developments in the various markets, with current focus on the importance of rolling out quality infrastructure in the Africa, LATAM, MENA, Europe and the Americas, the key messages at conference also centred around the recent topical issues, mainly the road to 5G, and the need to build next generation mobile networks to support fibre. The telecoms sector players seem to be actively tracking developments around 5G, not only because it is expected to complement fibre solutions, but also because 5G is no longer regarded as a spectrum-based network, but rather a platform that is scalable, segmentable and designed for the Internet of things.

The influence of the regulatory authorities in shaping and growing economies around the globe also came under scrutiny. As discussions gained momentum around the subject, it became clear that the market does not favour heavily regulated environments, as previous studies indicate that there is little economic growth achieved in such markets. Regulators were also urged to be agile to ensure that policies and legislations that being introduced, move at the same speed as the technological developments themselves. Locally, the government was urged to entrench investment-friendly policy and market certainty before infrastructure investment take place on a scale needed by SA.

The developments in the IOT market also received attention at the conference, as well growing interest in Big Data analytics. This despite growing concerns that Big Data is susceptible to hacking, and can also be used for spying. Privacy as well as discrimination challenges were also highlighted as possible danger areas as far as Big Data is concerned, as everything can be tracked and analysed through Big Data.

In the fibre market, opportunities in the highly urbanised areas are increasingly becoming small, this has prompted operators to now target small towns in their endeavours to build smart cities. The operators however conceded that the high cost of extending fibre internet services beyond urban areas does not make expansion to smaller towns viable, especially combined with the lower number of potential subscribers, although expenses associated with equipment and electronics of fibre networks have come down. Notably, operators are currently considering various models that they can adopt in order to bring fibre to these towns in a sustainable way, and have also urged governments to put incentives on the table, that will encourage them to roll out fibre in the small towns and cities, as well to stimulate uptake of services.

In terms of monetising fibre, operators were urged to embrace infrastructure sharing models, as these would allow them to reduce costs. It must nonetheless be emphasised that each market is different, meaning this preferred model might not be ideal for some markets. In terms of rolling out fibre networks, the general view is that Africa continues to be challenged by shortage of funding, shortage of skills, lack of proper planning as well as policy uncertainty, although the continent is at least getting the fibre footprint right.

Overall, an intervention to deal with the issues highlighted above will require operators to undertake careful studies to understand the problem, before possible solutions are implemented. This as we are moving to a fragmented world, that will be characterised by cloud services, integrated services, simplicity, and single identity.

Moreover, the increasing adoption of fibre solutions in various markets around the world is expected to have a positive impact on our journey to the 4th Industrial Revolution and the global digital economy. This is because the industrial Internet, Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data are also driven by optics, and so is the foundation of platform economics. However, telcos of today will continue to be challenged by the disruptive players such as OTTs and MVNOs, as well as growing competition facilitated by open access networks, more innovative solutions entering the market, and competitors that are quick to embrace newer technologies.

For further details, please contact Ofentse Mopedi.